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Best VPNs for Linux in October 2022

You deserve a great experience when using your computer at home or work, but not all VPN providers offer support for Linux devices. So if you're looking for reliable service—look no further than this list of the best VPNs for Linux computers!

40 Listed services

120,908Analyzed reviews

12,091Suspicious reviews

Service

Price

Servers

Open Source

Encryption

Data Cap

Free Trial

1

Malwarebytes logo
Truely score heart icon

4.2/5

4,929 reviews

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$3.75

per month, billed $44.99 annually

500

256 bit

250 MB

14 days

Visit site

2

SSL Private Proxy logo
Truely score heart icon

4.1/5

2,280 reviews

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$15.00

billed monthly

39

256 bit

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3

Fastest VPN logo
Truely score heart icon

4.1/5

2,824 reviews

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$10.00

$39.95 billed for three years of service

92

AES-256 bit

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5

Planet VPN logo
Truely score heart icon

4.0/5

390 reviews

Visit site
$1.99

per month, billed $95.55 per 3 years

1,260

256 bit

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6

CyberGhost logo
Truely score heart icon

3.9/5

3,283 reviews

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$2.29

per month, billed $89.31 per 3 years

6,000

AES-256 bit

7 days

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7

PrivateVPN logo
Truely score heart icon

3.9/5

4,717 reviews

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$2.00

per month, billed $72.00 per 3 years

200

AES-256 bit

7 days

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8

AVG logo
Truely score heart icon

3.8/5

3,821 reviews

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$3.75

per month, billed $134.99 per 3 years

500

AES-256 bit

1 week

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10

Strong VPN logo
Truely score heart icon

3.7/5

3,191 reviews

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$3.66

per month, billed $43.99 annually

950

AES-256 bit

30 days

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12

CactusVPN logo
Truely score heart icon

3.7/5

159 reviews

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$3.95

per month, billed $94.99 per 2 years

22

AES-256 bit

1 day

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14

Hotspot Shield logo
Truely score heart icon

3.7/5

887 reviews

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$817.92

per month, billed $9,815.04 annually

1,800

AES-256 bit

7 days

Visit site

#1

Malwarebytes

Malwarebytes

Best Overall

4,929 Reviews analysed

4,096 Positive

833 Negative

Visit site

Key facts

  • Servers

    500

  • Encryption

    256 bit

  • Data Cap

    250 MB

  • Free Trial

    14 days

Pros

  • Really appreciated by its users

  • Keeps my phone safe

  • Good value for money

  • Lots of long time users

  • Free version is great

See all

Cons

  • Premium version issues

  • Update issues

  • Problems with app store listing

  • Doesn't work on my phone

  • Disappointing free version

See all

Key facts

  • Servers

    39

  • Open Source

  • Encryption

    256 bit

Pros

  • Fast

  • Lots of long time users

  • Good value for money

  • Free version is great

  • Easy to use

See all

Cons

  • Connection issues

  • Customer service is bad

  • Premium version issues

  • No way to contact support

  • Slow performance

See all

#3

Fastest VPN

2,824 Reviews analysed

2,439 Positive

385 Negative

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Key facts

  • Servers

    92

  • Open Source

  • Encryption

    AES-256 bit

Pros

  • Fast

  • Good value for money

  • Lots of long time users

  • Fantastic service

  • Free version is great

See all

Cons

  • Connection issues

  • Customer service is bad

  • Slow performance

  • Compatibility issues

  • Refund issues

See all

Key facts

  • Servers

    1,260

  • Open Source

  • Encryption

    256 bit

Pros

  • Really appreciated by its users

  • Fast

  • Good value for money

  • Lots of long time users

  • Free version is great

See all

Cons

  • Compatibility issues

  • Problems with app store listing

  • Not recommended

  • Money transfer issues

  • No way to contact support

See all

#6

CyberGhost

3,283 Reviews analysed

2,660 Positive

623 Negative

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Key facts

  • Servers

    6,000

  • Encryption

    AES-256 bit

  • Free Trial

    7 days

Pros

  • Good value for money

  • Fast

  • Lots of long time users

  • Easy to install

  • Works perfectly

See all

Cons

  • Connection issues

  • Disappointing free version

  • Compatibility issues

  • Doesn't work

  • Customer service is bad

See all

#7

PrivateVPN

4,717 Reviews analysed

4,061 Positive

656 Negative

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Key facts

  • Servers

    200

  • Open Source

  • Encryption

    AES-256 bit

  • Free Trial

    7 days

Pros

  • Fast

  • Good value for money

  • Customer service is great

  • Really appreciated by its users

  • Lots of long time users

See all

Cons

  • Connection issues

  • Customer service is bad

  • Refund issues

  • Login problems

  • Slow performance

See all

#8

AVG

3,821 Reviews analysed

2,591 Positive

1,230 Negative

Visit site

Key facts

  • Servers

    500

  • Open Source

  • Encryption

    AES-256 bit

  • Free Trial

    1 week

Pros

  • Really appreciated by its users

  • Peace of mind

  • Works perfectly

  • Good value for money

  • Does exactly what it says

See all

Cons

  • Connection issues

  • Disappointing free version

  • Compatibility issues

  • You have to pay extra

  • Slow performance

See all

#10

Strong VPN

3,191 Reviews analysed

2,637 Positive

554 Negative

Visit site

Key facts

  • Servers

    950

  • Open Source

  • Encryption

    AES-256 bit

  • Free Trial

    30 days

Pros

  • Lots of long time users

  • Customer service is great

  • Fantastic service

  • Really appreciated by its users

  • Fast

See all

Cons

  • Login problems

  • Compatibility issues

  • Connection issues

  • Customer service is bad

  • Doesn't work on android

See all

#12

CactusVPN

159 Reviews analysed

112 Positive

47 Negative

Visit site

Key facts

  • Servers

    22

  • Open Source

  • Encryption

    AES-256 bit

  • Free Trial

    1 day

Pros

  • Really appreciated by its users

  • Fast

  • Lots of long time users

  • Good value for money

  • Fantastic service

See all

Cons

  • Crashes reported

  • Doesn't work on android

  • Problems with app store listing

  • Connection issues

  • Login problems

See all

Key facts

  • Servers

    1,800

  • Open Source

  • Encryption

    AES-256 bit

  • Free Trial

    7 days

Pros

  • Really appreciated by its users

  • Fast

  • Free version is great

  • Better than the rest

  • Works perfectly

See all

Cons

  • Disappointing free version

  • Customer service is bad

  • Connection issues

  • Doesn't work

  • Premium version issues

See all

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Frequently Asked Questions

Linux VPN is a software that can offer you a remote computer Network Interconnection (RCI) by using the Internet Protocol and Transmission Control Protocol. It is a somewhat newer VPN that you can use, it works like any other VPN, but it is Linux-based rather than Windows or OSX. They have more of a steeper learning curve to be able to use them.

A multitude of VPN services are available for Linux devices, and all can be used safely with a trusted company that creates them, all it boils down to is what features a user is looking for and what works with what a user wants. Generally all VPN services that work on other operating systems would work on Linux.

Yes! While Linux is indeed more secure than other operating systems, adding a VPN is more or less beneficial for Linux as it can add another layer of security which can help users protect themselves from network attacks such as phishing. VPN for Linux can be easily added and be used by a basic user.

Yes there are, in fact there are a multitude of VPN services that are available to use on Linux distros for free. While most are not safe to use there are some that have a good track record and great user reviews which people can use and avail the free VPN services for their own personal uses.

For normal usage by an average user, the Linux distro Ubuntu does not need to use any VPN when connecting to the internet as the basic security provided by the OS is enough. But for power users that constantly connect and download on the internet, a VPN is a must when using Ubuntu on Linux.

Step 1:

You'll need a host computer that has an internet connection and the Linux operating system.

Step 2:

Install Network Manager.

Step 3:

Install VPN of your choice.

Step 4:

Enable Network Manager VPN Plugin.

Step 5:

Enable Network Connections to appear in the menu.

An IP address is either linked to a network card or an adapter. To find it in Linux, open the terminal and type: ifconfig -a|grep "inet addr" && netstat | grep "tcp6.inet_timewait", grep "udp6.inet_timewait". Note that this will only show connections with established TCP connections and UDP packets, respectively.

Depending on the app, you could set it to connect any time you’re on an unfamiliar or public network. If your VPN is manually configured, getting it to run automatically will depend on your protocol and whether you use a third-party VPN app. Below are the steps on connecting a VPN automatically on Linux:

Step 1:

Create a connection from the command line and save it.

Step 2:

Check if the VPN is still connected: "ifconfig".

Step 3:

Edit the profile file and insert some lines.

Step 4:

Connect automatic connection to VPN with automatic reconnection in case of disconnection.

Step 5:

Add a new automatic connect/disconnect rule.

Step 6:

Setup automatic connection on boot by editing the rc.local file and adding appropriate commands there.

Step 7:

Restart your system to apply the changes made above.

When you have a VPN installed on your Linux operating system, data capping can be a constant concern. It is important to make sure that you install a VPN service that will not hit your data cap. When using the VPN, it is important to know how much data you are using and keep track of it. This way, you can manage the amount of data being used and not exceed the data cap.

All attempts at data manipulation made by either party in an attempted attack will be detected by the network's defense mechanisms such as checksums, firewalls, and malicious-activity records. In these cases, alerts are generated in order to allow sysadmins to take action or block the offender's device if necessary.

Excluding the free VPN service providers, a user can probably expect to pay anywhere between $2-$10 a month, depending on various factors. Plan features and payment periods often factor into the price. The longer a period a user opts to pay for in advance, the lower the price will usually be.

In the event that the VPN connection unexpectedly drops, the computer will continue to send and receive traffic sent over your ISP’s unprotected network, possibly without anyone even noticing. To prevent this behavior, a user can make a simple kill switch that halts all internet traffic until the VPN connection is restored. Below are the steps you can follow:

Step 1:

Create a startvpn.sh script that puts firewall rules in place. These firewall rules only allow traffic over the VPN’s tun0 network interface; it will only allow traffic over that interface to go to your VPN’s server.

Step 2:

Network traffic cannot pass over any other network interface with these firewall rules in place. When your VPN drops, it removes the tun0 interface from your system, so there is no allowed interface left for traffic to pass, and the internet connection dies.

Step 3:

When the VPN session ends, remove the rules to allow normal network traffic over our actual network interfaces. The simplest method is to disable UFW altogether. If you have existing UFW rules running normally, then you’ll want to craft a more elegant tear-down script instead. This one removes the firewall rules and then kills OpenVPN with a script called stopvpn.sh.

Step 4:

If a user uses some other means to connect to the VPN, a user can eliminate the last two lines of each script. In such a configuration, the user will have to remember to manually run the startvpn.sh script prior to starting your VPN using some other method.

Step 5:

Once the VPN session ends, remembering to run the stopvpn.sh script isn’t hard.